Definition of Anchor Text

Anchor text refers to the visible text that composes a link to another web page or resource. In the HTML link example that follows,

<a href="http://www.example.com">My Example</a>

The words “My Example” are the anchor text.

Search engines often look at anchor text to determine what the link is about and thus infer the subject of the site to which the link points. It is widely believed that placing keywords in anchor text helps search engine ranking.


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Definition of Above the Fold

A search engine result is said to be above the fold when it appears on the first page of search results and doesn’t require scrolling to view. Search engine users are less likely to click on results that are “below the fold” (require scrolling). Where the fold appears depends upon the user’s window size and screen resolution, but it is common practice to designate the fold as residing between positions 5 and 6. The second and subsequent pages exhibit dramatically lower performance than the first page, and the effects of the fold become negligible on these pages.

The term “above the fold” comes from the newspaper industry where headlines and advertisements placed above the horizontal fold are known to attract more reader attention.


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Definition of 307 Redirect

307 Redirect tells a web browser or search engine that the redirect is temporary. This usually represents a temporary relocation of content, such as if traffic is being re-routed to another server. Permanent moves should be implemented with a 301 Redirect.


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Definition of 301 Redirect

301 redirect is a method of telling web browsers and search engines that a web page or site has been permanently moved to a new location. Usually a 301 redirect includes the address to which the resource has been moved. Web browsers will typically follow 301 redirects to the new location automatically, without the need for user action.

A 301 redirect should be used whenever a website is moved to a new domain name (URL) so that search engines will quickly change their indeces and, in theory, preserve the search engine rankings that the site had at the previous domain.


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